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Geography

The teaching of Geography at
St Mark’s Primary School

 Our Intent

 The aim of our Geography focus is to develop children’s knowledge, understanding and curiosity in both their local, national environments and in the wider world. At St Mark’s, children are given the tools to investigate different human and physical features of places, near and far, through a range of different mediums and strategies. Understanding our intricate planet will lead to children developing respect for our physical environment and the various different cultures and beliefs that make up our world.  

 We want our children to be able to have an understand of the core concepts in Geography:

 

CORE CONCEPTS IN GEOGRAPHY TAUGHT ACROSS THE SCHOOL

 

 

Location knowledge

 

Place knowledge

 

 

Geographical skills and fieldwork

 

Human and Physical Geography

 

Sustainability

 

 

 Geography Topic Map

  

 

Theme?

EYFS

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Autumn

Local or national Geography 

 People, Culture and Communities

The Natural World

London life

 Icy Blast

 Active planet

The Island

Climate Catastrophes

Protecting the Planet

Spring

Agriculture, wildlife, human and physical geography

 Land to lunchbox

Rumble in the jungle

Chocolate

The Himalayas

Awe and Wonder!

London and it’s people

Summer

What a wonderful world!

Kenington
London

UK

Asia

 Europe

Europe

Africa

North & South America

 

 Topic choices are based on coverage outlined within the National Curriculum as well as themes that are linked to pupil interest and which enable us to promote broader diversity which reflects the backgrounds of the pupils at St Mark’s.

 

KS2

Pupils should extend their knowledge and understanding beyond the local area to include the United Kingdom and Europe, North and South America. This will include the location and characteristics of a range of the world’s most significant human and physical features. They should develop their use of geographical knowledge, understanding and skills to enhance their locational and place knowledge.

 

Implementation

  • Geography at St Mark’s will be taught in half termly blocks. Where possible, we will also use texts in English to compliment subject knowledge, to further enrich children’s understanding and exposure of the geography topic
  • Each Geography topic begins with a topic page which outlines the objectives that are to be taught during the term
  • Homework tasks will link to the termly topic, encouraging children to participate in additional research whilst at home. Work will then be brought into school and used in class displays
  • Within lessons, children will be exposed to the broader context within their topic, to help them to understand broader links
  • Vocabulary linked to topics will be on displays and pre-taught to help to support EAL and SEN pupils
  • Each term trips and/or experiences will be undertaken to further immerse students in the topic they will be learning about
  • At the beginning of each lesson, children will complete a ‘Do now task’ to reinforce knowledge retention
  • Teachers will use schemes of work and lesson plans developed by the school which embed our Geography vision within the content of the individual lessons and the theme as a whole.
  • Subject knowledge documents have been provided by the subject leader as well as inset training, to help to make our expectations for the teaching of Geography clear to all staff
  • ‘Big’ or ‘Fertile Questions’ should be used within lessons to probe and extend children’s thinking as appropriate. There are examples written into the plans.

 

 

Impact

The geography curriculum has been carefully mapped against the core skills and knowledge objectives below.  At the end of each topic, the children complete an assessment based upon the objects that were taught during the topic.  Based on termly assessment against NC objectives and evidence across the year, class teachers will assess whether pupils are working At age related expectations, above or below age related expectations.

 

St Mark’s Geography Progression of Skills and Knowledge

4 Key Skills:

  • - Locational Knowledge.
  • - Place Knowledge.
  • - Human and physical geography.
  • - Geographical skills and fieldwork.

The national curriculum for geography aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • develop contextual knowledge of the location of globally significant places – both terrestrial and marine – including their defining physical and human characteristics and how these provide a geographical context for understanding the actions of processes
  • understand the processes that give rise to key physical and human geographical features of the world, how these are interdependent and how they bring about spatial variation and change over time
  • are competent in the geographical skills needed to:
  • collect, analyse and communicate with a range of data gathered through experiences of fieldwork that deepen their understanding of geographical processes
  • interpret a range of sources of geographical information, including maps, diagrams, globes, aerial photographs and Geographical Information Systems (GIS)
  • communicate geographical information in a variety of ways, including through maps, numerical and quantitative skills and writing at length.
  • The complexity of each skill will build as the children progress through the curriculum. Each year, the children will build on the skills they have learnt in past years.

 

Early Years

 

Nursery

Reception

New Early Learning Goals

Early Learning Goals: (The World)

-    Children know about similarities and differences in relation to places, objects, materials and living things.

-    They talk about the features of their own immediate environment and how environments might vary from one another.

-   They make observations of animals and plants and explain why some things occur, and talk about changes.

Locational Knowledge

 

-    Talk about similarities and differences in relation to places, objects, materials and living things.

Place Knowledge

-    Notice detailed features of objects in my environment.

-    Talk about some of the things I have observed such as plants, animals , natural and found objects.

-    Talk about the features of my own immediate environment and how environments might vary from one another.

Human and Physical Geography

-    Look closely at similarities and differences, patterns and change.

-    Make observations of the environment and explain why some things occur and talk about changes.

Geographical Skills and Fieldwork

-    Enjoy playing with small world models such as farm, a garage or a train track.

-    Use positional language

-    Use everyday language to talk about positions and distance to solve problems.

-    Describe my relative position such as behind or next to

 

 KS1

Pupils should develop knowledge about the world, the United Kingdom and their locality. They should understand basic subject-specific vocabulary relating to human and physical geography and begin to use geographical skills, including first-hand observation, to enhance their locational awareness.

KS2

Pupils should extend their knowledge and understanding beyond the local area to include the United Kingdom and Europe, North and South America. This will include the location and characteristics of a range of the world’s most significant human and physical features. They should develop their use of geographical knowledge, understanding and skills to enhance their locational and place knowledge.

 

KS1 St Mark’s Geography Progression of Skills and Knowledge 

KS1 

Yr 1

Yr 2

Locational Knowledge

-    Name and locate the four countries making up the British Isles, with their capital cities.

-    Name the surrounding seas of the United Kingdom.

-    Talk about the main features of each of the four countries that make up the United Kingdom.

 

-    Locate and name the continents on a World Map.

-    Locate and label the five oceans

-    Name, locate and identify the characteristics of the four countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom and its surrounding seas.

 

Place Knowledge

-    Recognise similarities and differences of geographical features in my own immediate environment.

-    Talk about people and places within my local environment.

-    Compare Kennington with a contrasting place in the UK

-    Talk about people and places beyond my local environment.

-    Identify the key features of a location in order to say whether it is a city, town, village, coastal or rural area.

-    Compare a local city/town in England with a contrasting city in a different country

-    Identify the key features of a location in order to say whether it is a city, town, village, coastal or rural area.

 

Human and Physical Geography

-    Compare and contrast the human and physical features of two British localities, including how the use of land differs in each locality.

-    Compare and contrast a farm with the seaside.

-    Talk about weather in the UK, what happens in different seasons and how weather changes on a daily basis.

-    Identify land use around the school.

-    Use geographical vocabulary such as beach, coast, forest, hill, mountain, sea, river, weather, city, town, village, factory, farm, house, office shop to refer to the physical and human features of places studied.

-    Ask and answer geographical questions such as: What is this place like? What or who will I see in this place? What do people do in this place?

-    Talk about hot and cold parts of the world, discussing in relation to the equator and the North/South Poles.

-    Compare and contrast the human and physical features of a British locality with a non-European locality, including land use differences.

-    Use geographical vocabulary such as beach, coast, forest, hill, mountain, ocean, river, soil, valley, vegetation, season, weather, city, town, village, factory, farm, house, office, shop, port and harbour to refer to the physical and human features of places studied.

Geographical Skills and Fieldwork

-    Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping (Google Earth) to locate countries and cities.

-    Use aerial images to recognise landmarks and basic physical features.

-    Use simple fieldwork to observe, measure and record the human and physical features in the local area.

-    Use a simple key to recognise physical or human features on a map.

-    Create a simple map of my local environment.

-    Use locational and directional language such as: near, far, left, right to describe the location of features on a map.

 

 

-    Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping (Google Earth) to locate countries and describe features studied.

-    Learn and use the four points of a compass to describe the location of features on a map.

-    Use aerial images and plan perspectives to recognise landmarks and basic physical features.

-    Devise a simple map, and use and construct basic symbols in a key.

-    Use simple grid references. (A1, B1)

-    Use fieldwork to observe, measure and record the human and physical features in the local area.

 

LKS2 St Mark’s Geography Progression of Skills and Knowledge

LKS2

Yr 3

Yr 4

Locational Knowledge

-    Locate and name the continents on a World Map.

-    Name, locate and identify the characteristics of the four countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom and its surrounding seas.

-    Name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom.

-    Locate geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, including hills, mountains, cities, rivers, key topographical features and land-use patterns, and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time.

-    Name and locate some countries of Europe.

-    Share my own views about locations.

-    Explain my own views about locations, giving reasons.

-    Name and locate counties and cities of the United Kingdom.

-    Locate geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, including hills, mountains, cities, rivers, key topographical features and land-use patterns, and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time.

Name and locate the countries of Europe.

-    Name and locate the Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circles and date and time zones.

 

Place Knowledge

-    Compare geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, including hills, mountains, cities, rivers, key topographical features and land-use.

-    Identify the main physical and human characteristics of the countries of Europe.

-    Describe geographical similarities and differences between a region in the United Kingdom and one in a European country.

-    Describe how the locality of the school has changed over time.

 

-    Compare geographical regions and their identifying human and physical characteristics, including hills, mountains, cities, rivers, key topographical features and land-use patterns, and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time.

-    Identify the main physical and human characteristics of the countries of Europe.

-    Describe some of the features of the following areas: the Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circles and date and time zones.

-    Describe geographical similarities and differences between countries.

-    Describe how the locality of the school has changed over time.

Human and Physical Geography

-    Ask and answer geographical questions about the physical and human characteristics of a location.

-    Describe key aspects of physical geography, including rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes of an area in the United Kingdom and an area in a European country.

-Describe key aspects of human geography including settlements and land use of an area in the United Kingdom and an area in a European country.

-    Ask and answer geographical questions about the physical and human characteristics of a location.

-    Describe key aspects of physical geography, including rivers, mountains, volcanoes, earthquakes and the water cycle.

-    Describe key aspects of human geography including settlements and land use.

Geographical Skills and Fieldwork

-    Use maps, atlases, globes and digital/computer mapping (Google Earth) to locate countries and describe features studied.

-    Use locational and directional language such as: near, far, left, right to describe the location of features on a map.

-    Use fieldwork to observe and record the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods including sketch maps, plans, graphs and digital technologies.

-    Use a wider range of resources to identify the key physical and human features of a location.

-    Use the eight points of a compass, simple grid references, symbols and keys to communicate knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world. Create maps of locations identifying some features using a key.

-    Use maps, atlases and digital/computer mapping to locate countries and describe features

-    Use fieldwork to observe and record the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods including sketch maps, plans, graphs and digital technologies.

-    Use a range of resources to identify the key physical and human features of a location.

-    Use the eight points of a compass, four-figure grid references, symbols and keys to communicate knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world.

-    Create maps of locations identifying some features using a key.

  

UKS2 St Mark’s Geography Progression of Skills and Knowledge

UKS2

Yr 5

Yr 6

 

 

 

Locational Knowledge

-    Name and locate some of the countries and cities of the world and their identifying human and physical characteristics, including hills, mountains, rivers, key topographical features and land-use patterns; and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time.

-    Name and locate the countries of South and Central America.

-    Identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, Arctic and Antarctic Circle, the Prime/Greenwich Meridian and time zones (including day and night).

 

-    Name and locate some of the countries and cities of the world and their identifying human and physical characteristics, including hills, mountains, rivers, key topographical features and land-use patterns; and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time.

-    Name and locate the countries of North America.

-    Identify the position and significance of latitude, longitude, Equator, Northern Hemisphere, Southern Hemisphere, the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, Arctic and Antarctic Circle, the Prime/Greenwich Meridian and time zones (including day and night).

 

Place Knowledge

-    Understand some of the reasons for geographical similarities and differences between countries.

-    Explain how locations around the world are changing and explain some of the reasons for change.

-    Begin to understand and explain geographical diversity across the world.

 

-    Explain and discuss a range of reasons for geographical similarities and differences between countries.

-    Explain how locations around the world are changing and explain some of the reasons for change.

-    Describe geographical diversity across the world.

 

Human and Physical Geography

-    Begin to collect and analyse statistics and other information in order to draw clear conclusions about locations.

-    Begin to identify and describe how the physical features affect the human activity within a location.

-    Identify and describe the main human and physical characteristics of South and North America.

-    Begin to understand and explain how countries and geographical regions are interconnected and interdependent.

-    Name and locate some of the countries and cities of the world and their identifying human and physical characteristics and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time.

-    Describe and understand key aspects of physical geography, including: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes, and the water cycle.

-    Describe and understand key aspects of human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water.

 

 

-    Collect and analyse statistics and other information in order to draw clear conclusions about locations.

-    Identify and describe how the physical features affect the human activity within a location.

-    Identify and describe the main human and physical characteristics of North and South America.

-    Explain how countries and geographical regions are interconnected and interdependent.

-    Name and locate some of the countries and cities of the world and their identifying human and physical characteristics and understand how some of these aspects have changed over time.

-    Describe and understand key aspects of physical geography, including: climate zones, biomes and vegetation belts, rivers, mountains, volcanoes and earthquakes, and the water cycle.

-    Describe and understand key aspects of human geography, including: types of settlement and land use, economic activity including trade links, and the distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals and water.

 

 

Geographical Skills and Fieldwork

-    Use a few geographical resources to give descriptions and opinions of the characteristic features of a location

-    Use different types of fieldwork (random and systematic) to observe, measure and record the human and physical features in the local area.

-    Record the results in different ways.

-    Talk about the effectiveness of different geographical representations of a location (such as aerial images compared with maps and topological maps – as in London’s Tube map)

-    Use the eight points of a compass, four to six-figure grid references, symbols and keys (including the use of Ordnance Survey maps) to build my knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world.

-    Create maps of locations, identifying patterns such as: land use, climate zones, population densities and height of land.

 

-    Use a range of geographical resources with ease to give detailed descriptions and opinions of the characteristic features of a location.

-    Use different types of fieldwork (random and systematic) to observe, measure and record the human and physical features in the local area.

-    Record the results in a range of ways.

-    Analyse and give views on the effectiveness of different geographical representations of a location (such as aerial images compared with maps and topological maps – as in London’s Tube map)

-    Use the eight points of a compass, four and six-figure grid references, symbols and key (including the use of Ordnance Survey maps) to build my knowledge of the United Kingdom and the wider world.

-    Create maps of locations, identifying patterns such as: land use, climate zones, population densities and height of land.

 

 

Accompanying documents

Geography Positional Statement